Genealogy Data Page 66 (Notes Pages)

Individuals marked with a red dot are direct ancestors of Living JACOBS
For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.


KOCK Meta Henrica Marie (I3361) [Female] b. 16 NOV 1862 Thorshavn sogn, Færøerne

Source
Title: Danish Census

Back to Main Page


KOCK Magdalene Marie (I3362) [Female] b. 1864 Thorshavn sogn, Færøerne

Source
Title: Danish Census

Back to Main Page


KOCK Anna Dorthea Marie (I3363) [Female] b. 04 NOV 1865 Thorshavn sogn, Færøerne - d. 13 APR 1945 Frederiksberg, Denmark

Source
Title: Danish Census

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Back to Main Page


MILDWATERS George Kallaway (I3378) [Male] b. 19 MAY 1840 Adelaide, South Australia, Australia - d. 1908

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Back to Main Page


ARNOLD Mary (I3380) [Female] b. 1861

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

Back to Main Page


ARNOLD William (I3381) [Male] b. 1863

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

Back to Main Page


LA FARGE John Frederick Lewis Joseph (I3383) [Male] b. 31 MAR 1835 New York, New York, USA - d. 14 NOV 1910 Providence, RI, USA
Occupation: Artist: 1880

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

John La Farge

Birth: March 31, 1835 in New York, United States
Death: November 14, 1910
Occupation: Author, Craftsman, Painter
Source: Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Biographical Essay
Further Readings
Source Citation

BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
La Farge, John (Mar. 31, 1835 - Nov. 14, 1910), painter, worker in stained glass, and writer, though intensely an American, was all his life proud of his French blood. His father, Jean-Frédéric de la Farge, born in 1786 at Bussac, Charente Inférieure, grew up during the transition from the old régime to the new and at an early age embraced an adventurous career. Bred in the Napoleonic wars, he had both military and naval experiences. In December 1801, he embarked as an ensign on the expedition under General Leclerc to apprehend Toussaint l'Ouverture in Santo Domingo. A wound received during the passage of his ship through the British blockade seems only to have increased his love of action. He gave up his post as ensign for a lieutenancy in the army, was captured by Guerrier, and narrowly escaped massacre when he finally contrived to leave the island and board a ship that took him to Philadelphia. There his martial proclivities fell from him. Starting without capital, he developed such effective business traits that he succeeded in shipping, banking, and real-estate ventures, aided by connections with France. He forthwith dropped his French style, including the particle, and became John La Farge. Removing to New York, he established a hotel and engaged in numerous other enterprises. He acquired properties in Louisiana and in Jefferson and Lewis counties in New York. The village not far from Watertown, on the edge of which he built a mansion, came ultimately to be known as Lafargeville. This energetic man of affairs married a Frenchwoman, Louisa, the daughter of M. Binsse de Saint-Victor. They were living in New York, at No. 40 Beach St., when the future painter was born.

John La Farge came into a suave, gracious environment, in a neighborhood about midway between the Battery and Washington Square. With but few brief periods farther north, he dwelt always within easy reach of Washington Square--in Clinton Place, Washington Place, Ninth Street, Tenth Street, lower Fifth Avenue. All his life he maintained his studios in the famous building at 51 West Tenth St. There was always something about him, in his reticence, his dignity, his whole air of breeding, reminiscent of "Old Washington Square." But his upbringing was essentially French. He was steeped in the French language, in French manners and ways of family life, in the French care for religion and for the things of the mind. An English governess drilled him in the language and looked closely to his behavior. "I think I was a good boy," he once said, and "very innocent" (Cortissoz, p. 54). Also he "supposed" he went to school. At six he was reading Robinson Crusoe, and not much later pretty nearly everything from Homer to Voltaire. His education as the years went on was received from various sources--the grammar school of Columbia, St. John's College (later part of Fordham University), and Mount St. Mary's College at Emmitsburg, Md., where he was graduated in 1853.

A sheaf of letters that passed between him and his father when he was first at St. Mary's throws light upon his character and aptitudes, and upon the paternal understanding which fostered both. His father adjured the boy of fifteen to keep guard over his three younger brothers, to "give them good counsel and give it to them in such manner that they do not think you act as master .... Read them when you can the fables of Fontaine. Take the moral in it which is excellent in all the courses of life, and show them the application" ("Schoolboy Letters," post, p. 76). Greatly pleased with his son's progress, the father wrote, late in 1850: "I am persuaded that you advance always because you understand or seek to understand everything you read--that you have an excellent memory and all the good judgment that a boy of your age can have" (Ibid., p. 93). Some idea of what that phrase, "everything you read," involved may be gathered from a bald enumeration of the authors La Farge demanded of his father--Cicero, Catullus, Herodotus, Homer, Landor, Coleridge, Dryden, Goldsmith, and even twelve numbers of the Encyclopédie Iconographique. The letters chiefly reveal a devouring curiosity, foreshadowing the man who was, in his way, to take all knowledge for his province. Meanwhile, what of the arts? In his own words, "the influences which I felt as a little boy were those of the paintings and works of art that surrounded me at home .... There were on the walls a sea piece by Vernet; some imitation historical story, that of Daniel, charming, however, in color, by Lemoyne; ... a large painting of Noah and his sons, ascribed to Sebastiano del Piombo; ... many Dutch paintings of various authors and excellence, among them a beautiful Solomon Ruysdael .... All this and the very furniture and hangings of the Empire parlor did not belong to the Victorian epoch in which I was growing up. It so happened that my first teachings were those of the eighteenth century and my training has covered a century and a half" (Cortissoz, pp. 63-64).

As early as six he had "a mere boy's wish" to learn how to draw and paint and he had lessons from his maternal grandfather, Binsse de Saint-Victor, who appears to have been a good miniaturist. Later an English water colorist also gave him lessons. The reading of Ruskin withdrew him for a time from the atmosphere of the eighteenth century, interesting him in medievalism instead, but this mood passed. Art attracted him but not yet as a vocation. Insofar as any specific bent declared itself on the termination of his college days it was intellectual rather than esthetic. The mood in which he faced the future is reflected in this autobiographical passage: "In the early part of 1856, ... I went to Europe, having already passed some little while in a lawyer's office--enough to make me doubt whether my calling lay in that direction, ... Europe was to be a manner of amusement, and, for me, of taking up also some family connections" (Ibid., p. 73). He sailed in the celebrated side-wheeler, the Fulton, and, arriving in Paris, plunged into experiences which in the long run were to determine his career.

His sponsors, of course, were his relatives, the Saint-Victors. He saw much of the famous Paul de Saint-Victor, a man of letters occupying a place of high importance in Paris, and was often in the house of his grand-uncle, Paul's father. All about him was the stimulating world of Gautier, Victor Hugo, and Baudelaire. Romanticism was at its apogee but if La Farge needed a corrective for its redundancies he could always find it in the eighteenth-century gait of grand-uncle Saint-Victor. He visited the academic Géröme, then a promising young artist, and at the house of Chassériau he found raging all the time the war between things academic and things romantic. "At once one was asked what one held in regard to M. Ingres and M. Delacroix" (Ibid., p. 85). Presently, as an onlooker upon the mêlée, he had to make something like a decision for himself. His father advised him to study painting, "of which I was rather fond," as La Farge mildly put it, and American friends in Paris helped him to make choice of a master. They were "very much inclined" to Couture, so to Couture he went. His mode of establishing himself in the studio was characteristic. "I explained to him what I wished, which was to get a practical knowledge of painting, as practiced by him. I also made him understand that I was doing this as a study of art in general and had no intention of becoming a painter. This he at first thought preposterous and was probably somewhat astonished at the youngster who laid out this programme in such an unusual manner. But I argued with him, and won his good graces, so that the next day in the early morning I entered the studio and took my place with the others. I was given, in the usual manner, by the student in control, a seat and place, paper, etc., and I began drawing from the model before me. There being no one to guide me, and feeling that the way the others drew was not mine, I went on my own way. That day or next came in the great man, who, instead of objecting to my work having so little in common with those following his system, was pleased to say, on the contrary, that mine was the only one that really gave the motion of the model" (Ibid., pp. 91-92).

In its suggestion of a certain thoughtful independence this points to La Farge's whole evolution as an artist. Even Couture's appreciative treatment was not enough to hold him. He was in the studio only about a fortnight, frequenting the drawings of the old masters in the Louvre instead, on Couture's advice, and then hunting them down in Munich and Dresden. His travels took him as far as Copenhagen, and there he made a careful study of Rembrandt's "Supper at Emmaus." In Belgium he developed a profound feeling for Rubens, tracking down practically every painting of his in the country, and after that thrilling experience he spent the autumn in England, where he saw the great Manchester exhibition of 1857, admiring the Rokeby "Venus" of Velasquez and finding much interest in the juxtaposition of that master with Titian and Rubens. In England he was also for a time in the company of some of the Pre-Raphaelites. Returning to America in 1858, he went back to reading law.

He had not yet made up his mind. But he had architects and painters among his friends, he dabbled with brush and pencil, and in another year he was studying at Newport with one of his friend Couture's pupils, William Hunt. In 1860 he was married to Margaret Mason Perry, by whom he had nine children. Though for a moment the Civil War threatened to dislocate all plans, the fates willed otherwise. La Farge wanted to enlist but his shortsightedness unfitted him for the profession of arms and he was obliged, willy-nilly, to stay at home. There his vision answered for the pursuit of experimental activities, half artistic, half scientific, in which a newfound friend, John Bancroft, proved enormously stimulating and helpful. "He was a student," wrote La Farge, "almost too much of one, and we plunged into the great questions of light and color which were beginning to be laid out by the scientific men and which later the painters were to take up. This was the cause of a great deal of work but of less painting, if I may say so, less picture-making, because of an almost incessant set of observations and comments and inquiries supplemented by actual work in painting. All that I have done since then has been modified by those few years of optical studies, and the last realistic painting which may have shown it is the 'Paradise Valley,' which belongs to '66-'67-'68." (Ibid., pp. 121-22).

Not only chronologically but also in other more important ways the "Paradise Valley" supplies a perfect point of departure for consideration of La Farge's development as an artist. It was energized primarily by the operation of that mysterious force which is called genius but it was conditioned also by a factor not always noticeable among artists, a steady play of mind. The foregoing passage is prophetic. The optical studies to which he refers were fortified by others in many fields. Side by side with his investigations into science went research into nature. The "Paradise Valley" was in advance of its time. French impressionism was yet to make its impact upon American art but in this landscape La Farge, animated by his own inquisitiveness, reveals his own discoveries and anticipates the formula of Monet. "I wished," he said, "to apply principles of light and color of which I had learned a little. I wished my studies of nature to indicate something of this, to be free from recipes, as far as possible, and to indicate very carefully in every part, the exact time of day and circumstance of light" (Ibid., p. 112). He delighted in his association with Hunt and appreciated the latter's idolization of Millet but he adhered to his already ingrained habit of thinking his own way through the production of a picture. At the same time he was slow to yield to the purely creative impulses half unconsciously stirring within him and his later memories of that formative period were those of a young experimentalist much preoccupied with the ponderable problems of a craft. Referring to certain of his early landscapes, he dwells upon the effort that he made in them to achieve sheer accuracy: "They are studies out of the window to give the effect and appearance of looking out of the window and our not being in the same light as the landscape. And also to indicate very exactly the time of day and the exact condition of the light in the sky .... I aimed at making a realistic study of painting, keeping to myself the designs and attempts, serious or slight, which might have a meaning more than that of a strict copy from nature. I painted flowers to get the relation between the softness and brittleness of the flowers and the hardness of the bowl or whatever it might be in which the flowers might be placed. Instead of arranging my subject, which is the usual studio way, I had it placed for me by chance, with any background and any light, leaving, for instance, the choice of flowers and vase to the servant girl or groom or any one. Or else I copied the corner of the breakfast table as it happened to be" (Ibid., p. 116). In other words, the technician was finding himself, under self-imposed discipline.

From all this cogitation and experimentation there emerged a painter of equal proficiency and distinction, the kind of painter whose labors have a strange inner support, from which they draw most of their validity. Logical ratiocination--incurably characteristic of him--might be at the bottom of his work. He might say, as a thinker, recurring to the "Paradise Valley," that his program was "to paint from nature a portrait," but he went on to explain that it was also his purpose to "make distinctly a work of art which should remain as a type of the sort of subject I undertook, a subject both novel and absolutely 'everydayish' " (Ibid., p. 129). Being what he was now proving himself to be, an instinctive artist, in his paintings he subordinated the "everydayish" element to his originality. What made him ultimately a commanding figure in the American school was the fact that he saw his subjects beautifully as well as veraciously, that he had breadth of vision as well as control over the minute, passing effect, that he was a fine colorist and draftsman, and a skillful man with his hands. He was also versatile and industrious. His career, once inaugurated, was one of prodigious activities. At the outset he painted landscapes, flower subjects, and a few figure subjects. Incidentally he dipped into illustration. When the Riverside Magazine was started by Ticknor and Fields he made numerous drawings for it, taking his motives from Browning and other poets. In these he showed the quality of inventive imagination which was ever to stand him in good stead. He liked to tell of a piquant incident flowing from one of his early illustrations, "The Wolf Charmer." Long afterward he met in Japan a court painter, Hung Ai, and that luminary immediately exclaimed: "Oh, you are the wolf man!" (Ibid., p. 143). The old engraving had lodged itself in his mind for years. From the "stroke" Hung Ai had guessed the truth, that La Farge had used a Japanese brush on the design.

La Farge went on painting easel pictures for some time but even while landscape thus occupied him he had "become tempted and then drawn to work in the lines of architecture" (Ibid., p. 156); and, in 1876, he was invited by H. H. Richardson, who was then carrying Trinity Church in Boston to completion, to decorate the interior. There was then practically no such thing as mural decoration in the United States. The only pioneer in the field was La Farge's friend William Hunt, painting his charming designs in the Capitol at Albany. La Farge, however, so richly fertilized by his European travels and so apt in the logic of art, fearlessly tackled the huge walls in Boston, improvised a staff of helpers, and, working amid the crudest of conditions and under much pressure as to time, left the church astonishingly unified in a scheme of great warmth and dignity. It was the forerunner of divers important commissions, of panels in the Church of the Incarnation in New York, of others in St. Thomas's in the same city (which were destined to be destroyed by fire), of the lovely "Music" and "Drama" for the music room in the residence of Whitelaw Reid in New York, and many other notable achievements, "The Ascension," in the Church of the Ascension, New York, looming above all the rest.

This great painting had a curious origin. Dr. Donald, the rector, first consulted La Farge with a view to placing a stained-glass window in the altar wall. Then the painter had the idea of getting Augustus Saint-Gaudens to fill the space with a big bas-relief. Neither of these plans prospered and when Stanford White undertook the architectural renovation of the church the upshot of all their deliberations on the subject was La Farge's execution of his vast picture. At the moment of signing the contract, in 1886, he had agreed to go with Henry Adams to Japan and there, with characteristic freedom from convention, he found his background. "I had a vague belief," he said, "that I might find there certain conditions of line in the mountains which might help me. Of course the Judean mountains were entirely out of the question, all the more that they implied a given place. I kept all this in mind and on one given day I saw before me a space of mountains and cloud and flat land which seemed to me to be what was needed. I gave up my other work and made thereupon a rapid but very careful study, so complete that the big picture is only a part of the amount of work put into the study of that afternoon" (Ibid., pp. 164-65). In other words, "The Ascension," indubitably the greatest mural painting of a religious subject produced anywhere in La Farge's time, is in essentials the result of a sudden burst of white-hot inspiration, a fact which might be inferred from the spiritual force and pure beauty vitalizing it in a well-knit, soundly structural design. He impressively adorned other walls, especially those of the supreme court room in the state Capitol of Minnesota, at St. Paul, where he illustrated in four great lunettes "The Moral and Divine Law," "The Relation of the Individual to the State," "The Recording of Precedents," and "The Adjustment of Conflicting Interests." The deep student of religion, philosophy, and statesmanship, as well as the authoritative artist, is apparent in these compositions. The figure of Moses on Mount Sinai, in the first of these lunettes, is especially eloquent of La Farge's command of the grand style.

All through his mural period La Farge was also much occupied with work in stained glass. It was due to his genius that one of the great crafts of the Middle Ages was in America revived and lifted to a high plane. When he exhibited one of his windows, the Watson Memorial, at the Paris Exposition of 1889, the insignia of the Legion of Honor was conferred upon him by the Government, and his fellow artists, assembled as a jury, added to a medal of the first class this expression of their admiration: "His work cannot be fully gauged here, where a single window represents a name the most celebrated and widely known in our Sister Republic. He is the great innovator, the inventor of opaline glass. He has created in all its details an art unknown before, an entirely new industry, and in a country without tradition he will begin one followed by thousands of pupils filled with the same respect for him that we have ourselves for our own masters. To share in this respect is the highest praise that we can give to this great artist" (Ibid., p. 184).

La Farge treasured this tribute as one of the greatest strokes of good fortune in his life--taking it, too, as in some sort a ratification of his French blood. The beginnings of his glass were promoted casually enough. He was rather at a loose end, painting pictures that did not sell any too rapidly. In despair of finding a satisfactory market in New York, he was considering a proposal from Durand-Ruel to exploit his work in Paris and London. An architectural friend commissioned him, just then, to design a window for Memorial Hall, at Harvard, and as contact with the Pre-Raphaelites in England had interested him in glass he agreed to go on with the project. When he had made the window he liked it so little that he promptly destroyed it. During a convalescence in bed the secret of success came to him. A colored glass container of tooth powder on his toilet table caught his eye at the moment when light was passing through it. His imagination leapt to the suggestion and shortly afterward, with a Luxemburg glassmaker in Brooklyn for an aid, he had developed the "opalescent glass" on which much of his fame was to rest. He produced thenceforth thousands of windows, not only for churches but for private houses, and at least one renowned design, the "Peacock Window," which might be described as glass created for its own sake, the embodiment of the very genius of an artistic medium. La Farge was a born colorist. This is made plain by his early paintings, by the later works commemorating his travels in Japan and amongst the islands of the South Seas, and by his mural decorations. Yet it may be said that in his glass as nowhere else La Farge the colorist comes definitively into his own, investing his beautiful designs, whether based on the figure or on purely decorative motives, with a kind of orchestral piercingness and power.

It was an inordinately busy life that he led. He drew and painted; he made his glass; he traveled not only to Europe but to the far places of the earth; he lectured and he wrote. All the time he was dogged by ill health. He suffered from a slight lameness, he had had lead poisoning, he knew all about the pains of neuritis, he was often obliged to take to his bed from exhaustion, yet even there he was active with pencil or brush. He was six feet tall, deep-chested, with long and slender hands and feet. His dark brown hair, only subdued with touches of gray in his last years, crowned a magnificent head. His green-gray eyes were set in deep sockets; his nose was long, straight, and aristocratic; his skin was fine-textured and, while fairly warm in tint, had a certain parchment-like quality. A shrewd observer found him in his youth "picturesque." He was that always but the term requires a little qualification. Clothed usually in black and consistently fastidious in all his wear and ways, ceremonious without stiffness, he somewhat fused the traits of the artist with those of the man of the world. He had something of the aloofness, the mystery, characteristic of his great French contemporary, Puvis de Chavannes, and could be, when he chose, extremely difficult to approach. Also, when he chose, he could be most humanly accessible, sympathetic with young people, knowing how to laugh and to chuckle, delighting in a good limerick, and foregathering with a friend over a cigar with all the humor in the world. With all his scholarship, he had an extraordinary imagination and an almost mystical feeling for recondite ideas. In his talk he was as distinguished, as creative, as in his art, having--as in all things--a way of his own, very deliberate, elaborately parenthetical, and altogether fascinating.

When with Henry Adams he visited Japan and later went to the South Seas, he studied life with the directness of the explorer and with the more complex passion of the philosopher. An Artist's Letters from Japan (1897), and Reminiscences of the South Seas (1912), with illustrations from his own paintings and drawings, are a record not only of what he saw but also of the myriad thoughts evoked by his exotic surroundings. Writing of the siva dance, in the latter book, he says: "If I do not refrain and cut short at once, I shall become entangled in trying to give you word pictures that are utterly inadequate. I feel, too, that the drawings and paintings I have made are so stupid from their freezing into attitudes the beauties that are made of sequence" (Reminiscences, p. 119). As a matter of fact, his travel books, like his travel pictures, remain among the most typical things he did in color and in eloquence. Somewhere in his strange cosmos was the instinct of the poet; he had, indeed, a great literary gift. His earliest published writing was "An Essay on Japanese Art," prepared to accompany Raphael Pumpelly's Across America and Asia (1870). In 1893 appeared his pamphlet, The American Art of Glass. With A. F. Jaccaci, he edited Noteworthy Paintings in American Collections (1904), to which he contributed an exhaustive survey of Mrs. Gardner's collection at Fenway Court. Lectures that he gave at the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 1893 were later brought together in a volume entitled Considerations on Painting (1895). Those on the Barbizon school with which he inaugurated the Scammon Course at the Art Institute of Chicago were afterwards published as The Higher Life in Art (1908). In his Great Masters (1903) he recorded his critical interpretations of Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, Rubens, Velasquez, Dürer, and Hokusai. One Hundred Masterpieces of Painting (1912) has specifically to do not only with the giants of the art but also with the subjects that they treated. He writes of allegories, of portraits, of decorations. In the preface, written as the end of his life was drawing near, he said: "The contemplation of art is a form of study of the history of man and a very certain one. Its records are absolutely disinterested from any attempt at proving anything. ... We have before us (in works of art) the mirror of life at a given moment .... I have chosen masterpieces or beautiful examples, not only because they are beautiful, which in itself is all sufficient, but because they escape, in that way, the touch of the bad taste of fashion." In all his writings, down to the very last, The Gospel Story in Art (1913), which was prepared for the press after his death in Providence, R. I., by his old friend Mary Cadwalader Jones, his mind was set on the eternal verities. In these writings he is careful of facts, faithful to history, a learned expert, and, above all things, the reverent student of truth and beauty.

La Farge was unique in the Protean nature of his genius and in the operation of its multifarious activities in a peculiarly rarefied atmosphere. He had a kind of Leonardesque wisdom, an intellectuality which gave balance to everything he did and encrusted it with rich, subtle implications. His sensibility and his depth were matched by the delicate French precision with which he defined a thought in words or in the language of art. "In conversation La Farge's mind was opaline, with infinite shades and refractions of light, and with color toned down to the finest gradations" (The Education of Henry Adams, 1918, p. 371). He worked in paint or in glass, so far as his refractory mediums permitted, very much as he talked, and so he used a pen. He could be very simple and intimate, both in his early and late periods, and he could paint in the grand style when the theme called for it. In all his moods he painted with a certain authority. "The Ascension" and the "Peacock Window," two totally different conceptions, are alike in their demonstration of his command over mass and over nuance. He came indeed, in some quarters, to be regarded before he died as an old master born out of his time.

This was the feeling and the judgment of many of his contemporaries, in and out of his profession. His fellow artists held him in honor and valued his opinion. He had a devoted following amongst collectors. The adverse criticism that was occasionally directed against his work was never sufficient in point or in volume to lessen the prestige which gave him, finally, a sort of Olympian relation to his coevals as well as to his juniors. On what, specifically, is to be based any surmise as to the endurance of his high repute? In his earlier period he painted landscapes of great distinction but they do not place him in the category of landscape painters as Innes, say, is placed there. They are vitalized and beautiful but they are not numerous enough, he did not "follow them up" enough, for them to give him outstanding rank in their field. His flower subjects are so extraordinarily fine that they are always likely to retain a salience of their own. But neither the flower subjects nor the smaller figure pieces which he painted from time to time will give him his distinctive place. That he will probably owe to his stained glass and to his mural painting. He was the first American master of the fusion of decorative art with architecture and he remains the greatest, a colorist and a designer who developed remarkable powers as a collaborator with the builder. Both as a designer and a colorist he could make the easel picture a memorable thing. In the continuation of a wall, whether in glass or on canvas, he reached his highest level. To this more or less recondite claim upon the attention of the student of American art, giving new life to old tradition, he added imagination, extraordinary play of mind, and grace of style, attributes stamped with originality and distinction.
-- Royal Cortissoz

FURTHER READINGS
[The "Schoolboy Letters

Back to Main Page


RHINELANDER Frederic William (I3395) [Male] b. 12 DEC 1828 New York, New York, USA - d. 25 SEP 1904 Lennox, Berkshire, MA, USA
Occupation: 1880

Railroad President
1880 US Census

Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
F. W. RHINELANDER Self M Male W 50 NY R.R. President NY NY
Frances RHINELANDER Wife M Female W 48 NY Keeps House NY NY
Frances RHINELANDER Dau S Female W 23 NY NY NY
Ethel RHINELANDER Dau S Female W 18 NY At School NY NY
Alice RHINELANDER Dau S Female W 16 NY At School NY NY
Helen RHINELANDER Dau S Female W 14 NY At School NY NY
Fred W. RHINELANDER Son S Male W 20 NY At School NY NY
Thomas RHINELANDER Son S Male W 11 NY At School NY NY
Philip RHINELANDER Son S Male W 9 NY At School NY NY
Sarah KILGANNON Other S Female W 26 CAN Servant IRE IRE

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place New York, New York (Manhattan), New York City-Greater, New York
Family History Library Film 1254880
NA Film Number T9-0880
Page Number 142A
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
The display features three railroads: the Soo Line, the Chicago & Northwestern, and the Thunder Lake Logging Railroad. (Rhinelander itself was re-named when the president of the C&NW, F.W. Rhinelander, agreed to bring his railroad to the city).

Back to Main Page


RHINELANDER Frederic William (I3396) [Male] b. 13 APR 1798 New York, New York, USA - d. 1836

Source
Author: Eugene R. Stevens 1837 - 1905
Title: Erasmus Stevens, Boston, Mass., 1674-1690, and his descendants
Publication: Name: Revised 1914;

Back to Main Page


STEVENS Frederica (I3399) [Female] b. 01 JUN 1907 - d. 12 MAY 2000 Middletown, Newport, Rhode Island, USA

Source
Title: US Census 1930

Back to Main Page


RHINELANDER Alice (I3402) [Female] b. 1863 - d. 19 DEC 1898

Source
Author: The Statue of Liberty Ellis Is. Foundation Inc
Title: Ellis Island Immigration Records

Back to Main Page


BONNER George Thomas (I3407) [Male] b. 12 APR 1837 Quebec, Canada - d. 1924

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

Occupation: Broker: 1880

1. George T.1 Bonner was born Canada before 5 Sep 1902, the first event for which there is a recorded date.(14)

He married Isabel Sewell. Isabel was born Montreal, Quebec, CAN.(15) Isabel was the daughter of William Smith Sewell and Mary Isabel Smith.

He resided New Brighton, CT.(16) He resided New York, NY 5 Sep 1902, 115 E. Twenty First Street.(17) He bought property Cap a Laigle, Quebec, CAN, 5 Sep 1902.(18) Tract of land eighteen miles long by six miles wide, on the north bank of the lower St. Lawrence, extending eastward from Murray Bay. Three Canadian Seignories are virtually the last survivors of the old feudal system, and Mr. Bonner now becomes lord of the manor, with a manor house to which all inhabitants will come annually to pay tithes. In this seignory is included the famous fishing lake of Lagravelle.

George's occupation: broker New York, NY, 5 Sep 1902.(19) Member of the Union, Richmond County Country and Riding Clubs and of the National Academy of Design and of the American Geographical Society

George T. Bonner and Isabel Sewell had the following children:

2 i. Maud2 Bonner was born on (birth date unknown). She married Francis Cabot.

3 ii. Mabel Bonner was born on (birth date unknown). She married Mr. Stein.

4 iii. Isabel Bonner was born on (birth date unknown). She married Benoni Lockwood.

Back to Main Page


SEWELL Isabel Grace (I3408) [Female] b. 07 JAN 1842 Montréal, Quebec, Canada - d. 22 FEB 1912

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

Back to Main Page


BONNER Maud (I3409) [Female] b. 27 NOV 1870 New York, New York, USA - d. 1955

Source
Author: Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints
Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI)

Back to Main Page


BAYARD James Asheton Dr.(I3449) [Male] b. 28 JUL 1767 - d. 06 AUG 1815

Bayard, James Asheton, Sr. (1767-1815) -- also known as "The Chevalier" -- of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Nephew of John Bubenheim Bayard; son-in-law of Richard Bassett; father of Richard Henry Bayard and James Asheton Bayard, Jr.; grandfather of Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr.; great-grandfather of Thomas Francis Bayard, Jr.; great-great-great-grandfather of Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 28, 1767. U.S. Representative from Delaware at-large, 1797-1803; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1804-13. Died in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., August 6, 1815. Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Cecil County, Md.; reinterment in 1842 at Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery, Wilmington, Del. See also: congressional biography.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
James Ashton Bayard

1767-1815

Birth: July 28, 1767 in Maryland, United States
Death: August 6, 1815
Occupation: Diplomat, Statesman
Source: Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Biographical Essay
Further Readings
Source Citation

BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
Bayard, James Ash(e)ton (July 28, 1767 - Aug. 6, 1815), statesman and diplomat, was a leader among the Federalists of the United States during the first quarter-century. Of old Huguenot stock, he was descended from Petrus Bayard, whose mother Anna, widow of Samuel Bayard and sister of Peter Stuyvesant, came with three children on The Princess to New Amsterdam, May 11, 1647. Petrus obtained land in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, and his son Samuel in 1698 chose Bohemia Manor, Md., for his home. Here James, of the third generation, brought Mary Ashton, his wife, and here on Aug. 11, 1738, the first James Ashton Bayard was born. He was a surgeon in Philadelphia until his death in Charleston, S. C., Jan. 8, 1770. In 1760 he married Agnes Hodge, who on July 28, 1767, gave him a second son, James Ashton (as the name was originally spelled, although custom has fixed the modern spelling as Asheton).

At the death of his father, James Ashton Bayard was placed under the guardianship of his father's twin brother, John Bayard [q.v.] of Philadelphia, which continued until James's graduation from Princeton College, Sept. 29, 1784. During these fourteen years, and especially after the death of his mother in 1774, his immediate surroundings did much to determine the young man's future. His education was essentially conservative, whether at Piqua in Lancaster County from his uncle, at Princeton, or in the circle of Pennsylvania society in which he moved. Upon the completion of his college work he studied law with Joseph Reed and after 1785 with Jared Ingersoll, each of whom strengthened the conservative tone of his earlier training. When, therefore, he was admitted to the New Castle bar in August 1787, and at Philadelphia in September, and began the practise of his profession at Wilmington the same year, he was welcomed as a useful member of the Federalist party. And when on Feb. 11, 1795, he married Ann, daughter of Chief Justice Richard Bassett [q.v.] of Delaware, he acquired an important political and social position among the Federalist leaders.

The election of 1796 demonstrated Bayard's vote-getting ability in Delaware, sending him to the House of Representatives, which he entered May 15, 1797. An excellent opportunity to demonstrate his strength came soon after he had taken his seat. On July 3, 1797, Adams sent Congress a message and papers disclosing a plan of certain United States citizens to aid Britain in seizing Spanish territory in Louisiana. Earlier fears of a British attack in this section had been brought to the notice of Timothy Pickering, secretary of state since Dec. 10, 1795, by the Spanish, but such intentions had been denied by the British minister. Now a letter of William Blount [q.v.], senator from Tennessee, to James Carey, interpreter to the Cherokee Indians, dated Apr. 21, 1797, had come to light, involving the British minister and Blount himself in the plan. The manuscripts were laid before Congress and Blount's guilt seemed plain. No one claimed his innocence, but Gallatin and other Republicans declared that as a senator he was exempt from impeachment. The real criminal, continued Gallatin, was Robert Liston, the British minister, or President Adams, who had had "improper understandings" with him. In this crisis Bayard managed the case against Blount so ably that the latter was expelled from the Senate in July 1797.

Bayard played a decisive part in the disputed presidential election of 1800 when the decision between Jefferson and Burr, both Republicans, was thrown into the House of Representatives. The Federalists, on the principle that anyone was preferable to Jefferson, supported Burr for thirty-five inconclusive ballots. Then their leaders decided to shift to Jefferson if they could obtain from him certain assurances as to the future. Bayard's position as the most important Federalist in a border state, as well as his work for Federalist financial measures, 1798-1800, made him the most fitting negotiator for that impartial treatment desired by business interests as well as by officeholders in the National Government, His first approach was through John Nicholas, representative from Virginia and a particular friend of Jefferson. To him Bayard stated that "if certain points of the future administration could be understood and arranged with Mr. Jefferson ... three states would withdraw from any opposition to his election." They sought only assurance of support for the public credit, the maintenance of the naval system, and security for minor officeholders in their government positions. "I explained," continued Bayard, "that I considered it not only reasonable but necessary, that offices of high discretion and confidence should be filled by men of Mr. Jefferson's choice." In the latter group he placed cabinet officers, and as examples of the former he mentioned collectors at ports of entry. He was assured by Nicholas that the points seemed reasonable, and that Jefferson with the men about him would undoubtedly be of the same opinion. Bayard replied that he "wanted an engagement," and if this were conceded by Jefferson, "the election should be ended." He was unable to obtain a direct promise from Nicholas, but in his deposition of Apr. 3, 1806 (Bayard Papers, pp. 128-29), he states that Gen. Samuel Smith took the same three points to the Virginian and was authorized by Jefferson "to say that they corresponded with his views and intentions and that we might confide in him accordingly." Although no Federalist voted for Jefferson, by absence or refusing to vote "the opposition of Vermont, Maryland, South Carolina and Delaware was immediately withdrawn and Mr. Jefferson was made President by the votes of ten states" on the thirty-sixth ballot (Bayard's letter of Feb. 17, 1801, pub. in Niles' Weekly Register, Nov. 16, 1822). Shortly afterward, Bayard wrote to President Adams declining the proffered ministry to France as he would have to hold it during Jefferson's term to make it worth while, and if he did so he would be accused of having made an agreement with him.

In the discussions of "the judiciary reform measure" of 1801 and its repeal, Bayard ably defended the Federalist position. The fact that his father-in-law, Richard Bassett, was one of the new judges involved, was unnecessarily invoked to explain his stand. The personal factor may have added vigor to his words, but Bayard's belief in the need for the law and in the increased importance it gave to Delaware (Bayard to Bassett, Jan. 25, 1800), as well as his conviction that the repeal was "a most flagrant violation of the Constitution" and "prostrated the independence of the judicial power," were in all probability quite genuine.

Bayard's work in the Senate began Jan. 15, 1805, and continued until May 3, 1813. Much of his time was occupied with legal business, for while he disagreed thoroughly with the administration which "distinguishes itself only by its weakness and hypocrisy," he was equally certain that "no Federal prescription" would ever be taken to end the "political malady" of the period (to Andrew Bayard, Apr. 2, 1805; Jan. 30, 1806; Bayard Papers, pp. 164-65). Sane and moderate in his views, Bayard strove to uphold the dignity of his country against Britain or France as readily as he opposed the fitting out of the Miranda Expedition against Spain in 1806. A stanch believer in the superior abilities of an educated leadership, he was willing to subordinate himself if he could thereby be useful. An excellent illustration of Bayard's position was his national service under a hostile administration before and during the War of 1812. In 1808 he was willing to give Gallatin the credit of securing the renewal of the charter of the United States Bank expiring in 1811, or to join in obtaining a charter for a new one. The former was his preference, but during 1810-11 when renewal seemed impossible Bayard willingly served as chairman of the committee to secure a charter for a new institution. Defeated at this time by the vote of Vice-President Clinton, Bayard sought to keep the nation from the war into which she seemed to be drifting. He had little confidence in Napoleon's promises and saw clearly that Britain could not be coerced by commercial regulations (Bayard to Andrew Bayard, July 3, 1809; Mar. 5, 1810; to Wells, Jan. 12, 1812; Bayard Papers, pp. 177, 179, 188). He therefore joined Adams in urging that United States vessels be allowed to defend themselves and was pleased when our warships did so in the skirmishes with the Barbary States. He advised Federalist agreement in defensive measures and earnest support for all acts strengthening the army and navy. As late as May 2, 1812, he hoped the fear of additional free states from conquered Canada might induce the South to favor a naval war with Britain rather than land campaigns, a hope which had an unexpected measure of fulfilment in the war which followed. During this war Bayard is said to have "helped with his own hands to build a fort almost on the site of Fort Christina," the old Swedish fortress of 1638. Meanwhile necessity compelled the Republican leaders to abandon many of the methods used by Jefferson to obtain popularity. This brought Bayard and the President more in harmony as to the means of carrying on the war. A careful and judicious man devoted to his nation as well as to family and friends, Bayard was regarded as representing at this time both Federalist and Republican sentiment. The death of his sister Jane, Sept. 30, 1809, after serious mental derangement requiring much care from Bayard, allowed him more time for national service in those trying years, while his wife, who survived him until 1854, helped her husband during the war period by assuming many of the family cares.

With the European crisis of 1813 and the ability of the United States to maintain her rights upon the sea demonstrated, both Britain and the United States wished peace. Adams, Bayard, and Albert Gallatin, from different sections of the country, were appointed by President Madison to represent the United States. Bayard sailed from New Castle, Del., on May 9, 1813. By August 1814 when the representatives of the two nations met at Ghent, Napoleon had been captured, three armies had been sent to America, and Castlereagh, British foreign secretary, was willing to show the contempt he felt for the United States. A description of the negotiations is out of place here. Suffice it to say that eventually a treaty resulted, giving to neither party what it proposed but securing for the United States the control of the Mississippi River, eliminating from discussion certain questions which time alone could settle and others which the war itself had decided. In Bayard's opinion no power in Europe would soon disturb America again (Papers, pp. 366-67). On Feb. 27, 1815, Bayard was nominated minister to Russia, but he declined the position as he considered his services at that court unnecessary. His diplomatic ability was recognized in 1814-15, when he was chosen to continue with Adams, Clay, and Gallatin in negotiations for a treaty of commerce with Great Britain. Ill health prevented the completion of this mission, and on June 18, 1815, Bayard sailed from England for Wilmington, where he died six days after his arrival.
-- Charles H. Lincoln

FURTHER READINGS
[The papers of James A. Bayard, Am. Hist. Ass. Reports, 1913, II (1915), ed. by Elizabeth Donnan, and referred to as Bayard Papers; Bayard's letters to Cæsar A. Rodney in Dcl. Hist. Soc. Papers for 1901 (XXXI); Mass. Hist. Soc. Proc., Dec. 1914; J. T. Scharf, Hist. of Del. (1888); J. G. Wilson, Col. John Bayard and the Bayard Family (1885); Annals of Cong., 1795-1815; Aurora Gen. Advertiser and Aurora (Phila., 1795-1815); the more gen. histories of the United States, especially those by Adams, Hildreth, McMaster, and Schouler; Writings of John Quincy Adams; Works of John Adams; Complete Works of Benjamin Franklin; Works of Alexander Hamilton; Writings of Thomas Jefferson; Writings of James Madison.]

SOURCE CITATION
"James Ashton Bayard."Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.
Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: The Gale Group. 2004. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC

Back to Main Page


KING Job (I3456) [Male] b. 08 NOV 1778 Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA

Source
Author: Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints
Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI)

Back to Main Page


FISH Susan Elizabeth (I3471) [Female] b. 25 JUL 1805 Bowery, New York, New York, USA - d. 20 JUL 1892

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Back to Main Page


LEROY Herman (I3472) [Male] b. 16 JAN 1758 New York, New York, USA - d. 13 MAR 1841 New York, New York, USA

FOUNDED LEROY, GENESEE COUNTY, NEW YORK. IN 1813

Back to Main Page


CORNELL Hannah (I3473) [Female] b. 1760 New York, New York, USA - d. 25 DEC 1818 New York, New York, USA

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Back to Main Page

LEROY Jacob (I3474) [Male] b. 20 FEB 1727 Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands - d. 03 JAN 1793 New York, New York, USA

Grandfather Jacob LeRoy was a young merchant of French and Dutch ancestry when he arrived in New York City in 1753. He married Cornelia Rutgers at the Reformed Dutch Church in New York City on December 13, 1753. (The publication date of the new book commemorates their marriage.) Jacob and Cornelia had ten children, including Herman, for whom the Town of LeRoy was named. And Herman's son, Jacob, who lived in LeRoy House had ten children and seven of them had children - - 29 to be exact. Those twenty-nine children produced twenty-nine children, which were followed by thirty great-great grandchildren.

The seventh generation - of which Newbold LeRoy III is a member - - requires 106 pages. The book includes fourteen generations. It is interesting to note that of the ninety-four heads of family groups with identified children in the fifth generation, only 3 have descendants named LeRoy in the eighth generation. The LeRoy's married into well-known families such as the Astors, Livingstons, Vanderbilts, VanRensselaers, Fish and Wintrops. Henry Hoff, who wrote the foreword states: "This permanent record of Jacob LeRoy's descendant is a major genealogical achievement and the authors are to be warmly congratulated for their work. Compiling a book like this is truly a labor of love; LeRoy descendants are fortunate to have two such capable genealogists in the family."

Back to Main Page



This HTML database was produced by a registered copy of GED4WEB icon (web page link)GED4WEB version 4.33

Back to Top Of Page

Back to Main Page

Copyright 2014 Michael Jacobs