Genealogy Data Page 55 (Notes Pages)

Individuals marked with a red dot are direct ancestors of Living JACOBS
For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.


HILL William Rowe (I2542) [Male] b. 02 APR 1815 Lands End, Cornwall, ENG - d. 06 MAR 1900 Scotts Creek, South Australia, Australia

Event: Arrival: 1838

Back to Main Page


FAIRWEATHER Henry Howell (I2568) [Male] b. 18 AUG 1835 Killesk, IRL - d. 24 AUG 1885 Langhorne Creek, South Australia, Australia
Event - Arrival: Confiance: 1854

Back to Main Page


JACOBS Lilian M. (I2593) [Female] b. ABT 1871 Billingshurst, Sussex, England

Source
Author: UK Govt.
Title: UK Census 1881
Publication: Name: LDS Website;

Back to Main Page


JOLIFFE Ann (I2595) [Female] b. 1692 - d. 09 APR 1783 Newchurch, IOW, ENG

Source
Title: Hearn Family Tree
Publication: Name: Held in GEDCOM form by the IOW FHS;

Source
Title: Hearn Family Tree
Publication: Name: Held in GEDCOM form by the IOW FHS;

Back to Main Page


JOLIFFE John (I2596) [Male] b. 1698 Hazely Manor, Arreton, IOW, ENG - d. APR 1752 Arreton, Hampshire, England

Source
Title: Hearn Family Tree
Publication: Name: Held in GEDCOM form by the IOW FHS;

Back to Main Page


SEARLE Ann (I2597) [Female] b. 1694 Godshill, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England - d. NOV 1750 Arreton, Hampshire, England

Source
Title: Hearn Family Tree
Publication: Name: Held in GEDCOM form by the IOW FHS;

Ann SEARLE b. 1694, Godshill, 1 May 1694, Godshill, d. Nov 1750,
buried: 12 Nov 1750, Arreton. She is buried under a Yew tree in Arreton
Churchyard together with her husband. She is said to have planted the tree
which came from Wacklands farm. It was later moved to the churchyard by
Thomas Sibley and became known as the Hearn tree.

Back to Main Page


JOLLIFFE John (I2600) [Male] b. 1663 Godshill and Stenbury, Whitwell, IOW, ENG - d. MAR 1723 Shorewell, IOW, ENG
Occupation: Yeoman: 1695

Source
Title: Hearn Family Tree
Publication: Name: Held in GEDCOM form by the IOW FHS;

Back to Main Page


HEARN John Rev.(I2604) [Male] b. 21 JUN 1578 - d. 1648
Occupation: BET 1612 AND 1648

John HEARN b. 21 Jun 1578, title/occ: Rev. D.D., m. 22 Jun 1615, in
Newport, IOW, Elizabeth ALEXANDER. John died 1648. Rector of Chale John
Hearne matriculated 15 Dec 1592 aged 15 Magdelen College, B.A. 10 July 1600
M.A.27 May 1604 sup for B.D. 11 Dec 1611 incorp. Cambridge as M.A. 1612 and
was Rector of Chale Isle of Wight 1612 - 1648.

Back to Main Page


HERON William (I2610) [Male]
Occupation

Back to Main Page


LEIGH Thomas (I2615) [Male]
Residence: ABT 1630

Back to Main Page


JOLLIFFE William (I2616) [Male] d. 1663 Whitwell, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England
Residence: Nettlecombe: ABT 1640

Back to Main Page


JOLLIFFE Robert (I2621) [Male]
Occupation: Churchwarden: ABT 1589
Event - Lay Subsidy: 82 shillings: 1522
Event: Lay Subsidy: 1547
Event: Lay Subsidy: 1553

Back to Main Page


? Agnes (I2622) [Female] d. 1589
Event - Lay Subsidy: 3 pounds: 1563

Back to Main Page


JACOB William Hearn (I2623) [Male] b. 17 OCT 1858 New York, New York, USA - d. 1908 Greenwood Cemetry, Brooklyn, NY

Source
Author: Leonard Jacobs
Title: Jacobs Book/Manuscript
Publication: Name: c 1900;

Source
Author: Leonard Jacobs
Title: Jacobs Book/Manuscript
Publication: Name: c 1900;

Occupation: 1880
Census: 1880

Source
Author: US Government
Title: US Census 1880
Publication: Name: Index published by Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints;

Source
Author: Leonard Jacobs
Title: Jacobs Book/Manuscript
Publication: Name: c 1900;

Back to Main Page


PHELPS Mary (I2624) [Female] b. 01 APR 1866 Lakeville, Salisbury, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States - d. 14 FEB 1949 New York, United States

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Source
Author: Leonard Jacobs
Title: Jacobs Book/Manuscript
Publication: Name: c 1900;

Source
Author: Leonard Jacobs
Title: Jacobs Book/Manuscript
Publication: Name: c 1900;

Source
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: Public Member Trees
Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:
2006;

Back to Main Page


JACOB Mary Phelps (I2625) [Female] b. 20 APR 1892 New York, New York, USA - d. 24 JAN 1970 Rome, Roma, Lazio, Italy

Source
Author: Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints
Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI)

Caresse Crosby Notes

Born Mary Phelps Jacob, and called Polly, she was the daughter of a prominent New England family. Her ancestry included Governor Bradford, the Plymouth Colony's first governor and Robert Fulton, developer of the steamboat. Polly, who would later rename herself Caresse, became a writer, publisher and bra designer.

A childhood of privilege included private school, dancing school, and horseriding school. She was a rather disinterested student. One commentator writes that for the most part Polly "lived her life in dreams." (Wolff).

On November 3, 1914 the United States Patent Office issued a patent to Polly Jacob for a "backless bra" she created out of handkerchiefs, ribbon and cord. While not the first modern bra, it was a unique and creative solution to the problem of supporting women's breasts . Crosby started a business that failed to properly market the product and she eventually sold the patent for $1,500 to a corset manufacturing company.

In 1915 Polly Jacob married Richard Rogers Peabody. Peabody was the son of one of the most prominent Massachusetts families. By the early 20th century a case could be made that the Peabodies had supplanted the Cabots and the Lodges as the most distinguished name in the area.

Of this marriage, two children were born: a son, William Jacob in 1916 and a daughter Polly ("Poleen") the following year. Richard Peabody was a well-educated but undirected man and a reluctant father. He would soon suffer the personal consequences of his war experiences and became an alcoholic with a fetish for fighting fires.

Polly's life was difficult during the war years and when her husband returned home, significantly changed, her life soon changed abruptly too.

The catalyst for Polly Jacob Peabody's transformation was her introduction and eventual marriage to Harry Grew Crosby, another scion of a socially prominent Boston family and another veteran and victim of the recent war. Polly divorced Richard Peabody who was now in and out of hospitals because of alcohol abuse.
On September 9, 1922 Harry and Polly were married and two days later they moved to France to join the other American expatriates, spiritually licking the wounds suffered during the Great War.

In 1924 Polly formally changed her name to Caresse. The next year she and Harry founded the Black Sun Press which published the work of a number of writers including Hart Crane, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence and others. Caresse published her own book of poetry called Crosses of Gold.

After Harry Crosby's remarkable suicide in 1929, Caresse continued her writing and publishing work at Black Sun. She also established Crosby Continental Editions, a book company that published paperback books by Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker, among others.

In 1937 she married a football player, Selbert Young, who was nearly twenty years her junior. With Young she moved to Virginia. She opened an art gallery in Washington D.C. and started Portfolio a magazine about art and literature. She also was politically active and founded the organization Women Against War.
In 1950 she divorced Young and moved to Italy where she planned to create an artists colony. She published an autobiography in 1953 called The Passionate Years. And in 1970, Caresse Crosby, then in relative obscurity, died.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Caresse Crosby

1892-1970

Source: Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2003.
Entry Updated : 10/08/2003

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Career
Further Readings
Personal Information
Sidelights
Source Citation
Writings

"Sidelights"
As an expatriate in Paris in the 1920s, Caresse Crosby was a publisher and patron of the arts who helped the careers of such writers as Henry Miller, T. S. Eliot, and D. H. Lawrence. With her husband Harry Crosby, she published work by Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Kay Boyle, Hart Crane, and other leading modernists. She initiated a line of paperback reprints and founded a literary magazine, as well as writing several volumes of poetry and a racy memoir. She also sponsored and promoted individual writers in whom she believed, organized exhibits the Crosby Gallery of Modern Art in Washington, DC, and established an artists' colony in Italy.

Crosby's bohemian existence in Paris contrasts with her proper upbringing. Born Mary Phelps Jacob, and called Polly by her childhood friends, she was the daughter of William and Mary Phelps Jacob. She could trace her lineage back not only to the Mayflower, but to William Bradford, Massachusetts's first governor; other ancestors included steamboat inventor Robert Fulton and Civil War hero General Walter Phelps, leader of the "Iron Brigade." As befit her family's social standing, she attended private schools in New York and made her debut at Sherry's. As a child she created her own newspaper, the Madison Avenue Gazette, with poetry and articles of local interest; it reached a print run of twenty.

Crosby also dabbled at inventing, and in 1913 she hit upon a decidedly useful invention: the wireless brassiere, for which she sold the patent for $1,500. The backless garment, meant to replace the corset, had a light, relatively unconstricted design. When Crosby died in 1970, many of the obituaries entirely overlooked her lengthy and significant publishing career, instead citing the brassiere as her greatest accomplishment.

At twenty-two she married Richard Rogers Peabody, a banker in Boston with similarly upper-class background, and the couple had two children before their divorce was finalized in 1921. Peabody's alcoholism, which became rapidly worse after he served in World War I, no doubt contributed to the divorce, but the main reason was that Polly Peabody had met Harry Crosby, also from a prominent family, who was attending Harvard as a returned veteran.

Their very public affair generated shock waves through Boston and New York City: not only was the future Caresse Crosby still Mrs. Peabody, with two small children, but Harry Crosby was six years younger. Hoping to discourage their relationship, Harry Crosby's family set up a job for him with J. P. Morgan in Paris, but the freshly divorced Polly-no- longer-Peabody immediately joined him. After spending May through July 1922 together in Paris, the Crosbys were officially married in New York City in September, and sailed for Paris with her two children.

The Crosbys soon became part of the Parisian literary and social scene. Their interests were, after all, bookish: after Harry Crosby left his bank job, they devoted themselves to reading, writing, translating, studying, and eventually editing and publishing. But they were also good-looking, charismatic, hedonistic, and rich. Harry Crosby in particular developed a reputation for shocking people with his flamboyant behavior and dress. In their Paris apartment and, later, in their Ermenonville country house (a restored old mill), they entertained writers, artists, socialites, and royalty. They also enjoyed gambling on horses and dogs, and kept burros at Ermenonville to race and for polo-playing.

The Crosbys seven-year-long marriage was a whirl of parties and affairs, but they also made time for their literary interests. Polly officially changed her name to Caresse in 1924, not long before the appearance of her first book, Crosses of Gold. Her husband helped her come up with her pen name by suggesting that the new name "begin with a C to go with Crosby and it must form a cross with mine"; they called the form made by their two names, intersecting at right angles at the common "R," "the Crosby cross." The 1925 volume Crosses of Gold, illustrated with her own watercolors, consists mostly of love lyrics. Like those of the similarly conventional volumes that followed, they center around two themes: the pursuit of the ideals of Love and Beauty, and her relationship with her husband. She celebrates the physical side of love, but formally her poems are unadventurous. Both the Crosbys tended to dramatize, even mythologize, their lives in their writings.

Graven Images, her second book, was published by Houghton Mifflin in Boston in 1926. It was the only book by either husband or wife not to be published first at their own expense. In her autobiography, Crosby cites Harry's cousin Walter Berry as saying that because "they have just lost Amy Lowell," Houghton Mifflin needed a new woman poet. Crosby was "still rhyming love with dove," by her own admission. While a Boston Transcript critic declared that Crosby's "poetry sings" and a Literary Review contributor admired the "charming" child poems and French flavor, a New York Herald Tribune commentator was more critical, asserting that "[f]or all its enthusiasm there is no impact to thought or phrase, the emotion is meager, the imagination bridled."

The next year, Painted Shores was published, a book which traced the Crosbys relationship, including their reconciliation after one of his affairs. As a whole it is more crafted and more inventively organized than her previously books. In Crosby's epic 1928's The Stranger, she addresses her father, husband, and son, and explores the different kinds of love she has experienced. It is the only one of her books that could be considered experimental. In the same year, Impossible Melodies addressed similar themes.

The Crosbys publishing endeavors began as a way to get their own work into print. Their first imprint was Editions Narcisse (after their black whippet), a name they soon changed to Black Sun Press. The name derived from Harry Crosby's private mythology of the sun as a symbol for life and death, creation and destruction. This dissolution of opposites reflected his post-war obsession with death and suicide; the title of his autobiography, Shadows of the Sun, came also out of this mythology that put death at the center of life. The books are beautifully designed, with great attention to detail. Caresse was more involved in running the publishing company, perhaps because Harry was often absorbed in his own writing.

After Shadows of the Sun, Black Sun Press published a diverse assortment of books. Among the first were an ancient erotic manuscript which the Crosbys claimed to have found in Damascus, complete with tiny line drawings of twenty-two sexual positions, and two stories by D.H. Lawrence, Sun and The Escaped Cock. Walter Berry left his library to Harry Crosby in his will, and from it the Crosbys gleaned material for 1928's Letters of Henry James to Walter Berry and 1929's 47 Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry. Black Sun also published Harry Crosby's Transit of Venus, a collection of love poems. Although it was dedicated to Caresse, the love interest is in fact Josephine Rotch, a young woman from Boston whom Harry Crosby met while she was shopping for her upcoming marriage. Rotch married her fiance, Albert Bigelow, but began an affair with Harry Crosby.

The Crosbys also printed work by Kay Boyle, Hart Crane, Archibald MacLeish, and numerous expatriate writers, including Bob Brown and Eugene Jolas. After Ernest Hemingway introduced Harry Crosby to James Joyce in 1928, Crosby was able to persuade Joyce to publish three fragments with Black Sun: "The Mookse and the Gripes," "The Muddest Thick That Was Ever Heard Dump," and "The Ondt and the Grasshopper." Joyce heavily edited the galleys. After the printer, Roger Lescaret, figured out that there would only be two lines on the last page, he asked Caresse to have Joyce add a few lines. She refused, saying that a great writer does not "inflate a masterpiece to help out the printer," so Lescaret went directly to Joyce, who immediately agreed. Joyce claimed that he had wanted to add more text before, but was too afraid of Caresse. Also in 1929, the Crosbys published an edition of Lawrence Sterne's The Sentimental Journey, with illustrations by their friend Polia Chentoff, and Les Liasons Dangereuses by Choderlos De Laclos, illustrated by their friend Alastair (who contributed art to many Black Sun publications).

Fortunately for Black Sun, Caresse Crosby's publishing tastes were more modernist than her own often sentimental work. In one radical act, both Crosbys signed the manifesto issued by the literary journal transition. The "Revolution of the Word Proclamation" announced the end of literary conventions, declaring that "pure poetry" comes wholly from within, and can be written "ONLY THROUGH THE RHYTHMIC `HALLUCINATION OF THE WORD,'" the last phrase a reference to Rimbaud.

In December, 1929, a year and a half after they met, Josephine Rotch Bigelow and Harry Crosby died in a joint suicide pact. Harry saw the suicide as the ultimate act of creativity, and the joint suicide as the supreme affirmation of love. Caresse continued to run Black Sun Press and published more of her husband's diaries and poems, as well as Hart Crane's The Bridge, Proust's letters to Berry, MacLeish's New Found Land, Ezra Pound's Imaginary Letters and Mr. Knife Miss Fork, and a 1930 edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland with illustrations by Marie Laurencin.

With Jacques Porel, Crosby founded Crosby Continental Editions, a line of English classics and modern works in paperback format. For the debut volume, Hemingway offered her choice of The Torrents of Spring or The Sun Also Rises, and she picked the former, which unfortunately was less in demand and included an insulting portrait of Sherwood Anderson. The nine books which followed in 1932 included William Faulkner's Sanctuary, Kay Boyle's Year Before Last, Dorothy Parker's Laments for the Living, and Antoine de Saint-Exupery's Night-Flight. When after six months the books had only made about twelve hundred dollars, Crosby sought to stir up interest in paperback books in the United States, but publishers were not convinced that readers would want them.

Crosby returned to the United States in the mid-1930s and bought a plantation outside of Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she continued, erratically, to publish books and fund some writers. In 1937 she married Selbert Young, and after their divorce in the early 1940s she moved to Washington, DC, to run the Crosby Gallery of Modern Art. Its exhibitions included a one-man show of Henry Miller's paintings. She also staged Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. In 1945, she started Portfolio: An Intercontinental Review, an international literary magazine with a format of loose pages. Contributors included Matisse, Picasso, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gwendolyn Brooks, Kay Boyle, Karl Schapiro, Max Ernst, Man Ray, Stephen Spender and Jean Genet. During this period she was also politically active in combating racial segregation.

Crosby's last home was a castle about fifty miles north of Rome, which she bought in the early 1950s. The castle was an informal artists' and writers' retreat, as Crosby invited various people to come live and work with her. During the 1950s and 1960s she also headed two international peace organizations, Women Against War and Citizens of the World. She bought a parcel of land in Delphi and a mountaintop in Cypress, hoping to create a place for political leaders and artists from around the world to meet together.

Crosby's 1953 memoir The Passionate Years focuses mainly on her earlier years with Harry Crosby in Paris. While it was considered to be somewhat shaky in terms of facts and patchy in organization, Crosby was hailed as a marvelous storyteller--especially of risque stories. W. T. Scott in The New York Herald Tribune Book Review recommended it to "all readers who revel in gossip of society, Bohemia, scandal, and deliberate letting of freedom ring," but also made clear that the book's merits transcended its shock value: "the awareness and skill of the reminiscence are themselves notable."

"I have learned that personal life is the individual's only means of expression in a cosmos forever mysterious," Crosby wrote in The Passionate Years. Crosby's own greatest work of art, according to many commentators, appears to have been not her poetry, but her long, generous, and creative life.

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Family: Born Mary Phelps Jacob, April 20, 1892, in New York, NY; died January 24, 1970, in Rome, Italy; daughter of William and Mary Phelps Jacob; married Richard Rogers Peabody (a banker), January, 1915 (divorced December, 1921); married Henry Grew Crosby (a poet), September 9, 1922 (committed suicide, December, 1929); married Selbert Young, March 24, 1937 (divorced); children: (first marriage) William Jacob and Polly.

CAREER
Poet and publisher.

WRITINGS BY THE AUTHOR:

(Contributor) Harry Crosby, editor, Anthology, Privately printed (Paris, France), 1924.

Crosses of Gold, Privately printed (Paris, France), 1925, enlarged edition, Messein (Paris, France), 1925.

Graven Images, Houghton Mifflin (Boston and New York City), 1926.

Painted Shores, Editions Narcisse (Paris, France), 1927.

The Stranger, Editions Narcisse (Paris, France), 1928.

Impossible Melodies, Editions Narcisse (Paris, France), 1928.

(Editor and translator with Harry Crosby) 47 Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1930.

Poems for Harry Crosby, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1931.

The Passionate Years, Dial (New York, NY), 1953, enlarged edition, Redman (London, England), 1955, Southern Illinois University Press (Carbondale, IL), 1968.

Contributor of "The Stranger" to Transition.

FURTHER READINGS ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
BOOKS

Blain, Virginia, Patricia Clements and Isobel Grundy, Feminist Companion to Literature in English: Women Writers from the Middle Ages to the Present, Yale University Press, 1990.

Crosby, Caresse, The Passionate Years, Dial, 1953.

Dictionary of Literary Biography, Gale (Detroit), Volume 4: American Writers in Paris, 1920-1939, edited by Karen Lane Rood, 1980, Volume 48: American Poets, 1880-1945, Second Series, edited by Peter Quartermain, 1986.

Tucker, Martin, editor, Literary Exile in the Twentieth Century, Greenwood Press, 1991.

PERIODICALS

Boston Transcript, June 26, 1926, p. 3.

Literary Review, May 29, 1926, p. 4.

New York Herald Tribune, October 24, 1926, p. 22.

New York Herald Tribune Book Review, April 19, 1953, p. 10.*

SOURCE CITATION

Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2004. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: The Gale Group. 2004. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC

Back to Main Page


CROSBY Henry Grew (I2627) [Male] b. 04 JUN 1898 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA - d. 10 DEC 1929

Source
Author: Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints
Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI)

Harry Crosby

1898-1929

Source: Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2003.
Entry Updated : 12/16/2003

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Career
Further Readings
Personal Information
Sidelights
Source Citation
Writings

"Sidelights"
Remembered as a brilliant, energetic poet, Harry Crosby was a member of an eccentric group of American expatriates who enlivened Paris in the 1920s. His early collection of poems, Sonnets for Caresse, expresses a hatred of the Puritan ethic that had permeated his Boston childhood and calls for an end to sexual hypocrisy. Other works by Crosby, including Chariot of the Sun and Transit of Venus, reveal the poet's growing preoccupation with mystical sun worship. Written shortly before Crosby's suicide, Sleeping Together and Mad Queen portray the sun as a life-giver and destroyer and suggest that the poet was nearly consumed by thoughts of death. Crosby was also a publisher whose Black Sun Press Produced finely designed and manufactured volumes of works by important new authors. Limited editions of the writings of authors such as James Joyce and T.S. Eliot have become collectors' items and have led some observers to believe that Crosby's most important contribution to literature was his work as a publisher.

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Family: Born June 4, 1898 in Boston, MA; committed suicide, December 10, 1929; married Polly Peabody, September 9, 1922. Education: Harvard University, B.A., 1921.

CAREER
Poet.

WRITINGS BY THE AUTHOR:

(Editor) Anthology, privately printed (Paris, France), 1924.

Red Skeletons, Editions Narcisse (Paris, France), 1927.

(Author of foreword) Oscar Wilde, The Birthday of Infanta, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1928.

Chariots of the Sun, At the Sign of the Sundial (Paris, France), 1928.

Sonnets for Caresse, Editions Narcisse (Paris, France), 1927.

Shadows of the Sun, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1928, second series, 1929, third series, 1930.

Six Poems, Latterday (New York, NY), 1928.

Chariot of the Sun, Cour du soleil d'or (Paris, France), 1928.

Mad Queen: Tirades, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1929.

The Sun, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1929.

Transit of Venus, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1929.

Aphrodite in Flight, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1930.

Forty-seven Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1930.

Sleeping Together: A Book of Dreams, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1931.

Torchbearer, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1931.

Transit of Venus: Poems, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1931.

War Letters, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1932.

(Editor and translator with Caresse Crosby) 47 Unpublished Letters from Marcel Proust to Walter Berry, Black Sun Press (Paris, France), 1930.

Devour the Fire: The Selected Poems of Harry Crosby, Two Windows Press (Berkeley, CA), 1983.

FURTHER READINGS ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
BOOKS

Crosby, Harry, Shadows of the Sun, three volumes, Black Sun Press, 1928-30.

Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 4: American Writers in Paris, 1920-1939, Gale (Detroit, MI), 1980.

Geoffrey Wolf, Black Sun: The Brief Transit and Violent Eclipse of Harry Crosby, Random House, 1976.

PERIODICALS

Time, September 6, 1976.

SOURCE CITATION

Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2004. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: The Gale Group. 2004. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC

Harry Crosby
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other persons named Harry Crosby, see Harry Crosby (disambiguation).

Harry Crosby (June 4, 1898 – December 10, 1929) was an American heir, bon vivant, poet, and for some, an exemplar of the Lost Generation in American literature.

Born Henry Sturgis Crosby (his parents later changed his middle name to "Grew") in Boston's exclusive Back Bay neighborhood, he was the son of one of the richest banking families in New England and the nephew of the son of J.P. Morgan, the financier. As such, he was heir to a substantial family fortune.

During World War I, Harry Crosby said he wanted to escape "the horrors of Boston and particularly of Boston virgins" and volunteered with the American Field Service in France, serving at the Front as a driver in the dangerous ambulance service. On November 22, 1917, a German shell seriously wounded a man standing next to Crosby and as he drove several wounded soldiers to the Medical Corps, his ambulance came under heavy fire. Harry Crosby said that was the night he changed from a boy to a man.

In 1921 Crosby married Mary Phelps Jacob, who later took the name "Caresse" Crosby. Two days after their wedding, they moved to Paris, France, where he worked in his uncle's bank. Uninterested in a respectable banker's life and desiring to pursue life as a poet, Crosby quit his job at the Morton Harjes Bank and in April of 1927 he and wife Caresse founded a book publishing company. Originally named Éditions Narcisse, it was later changed to the Black Sun Press. By 1928, Harry Crosby gained some recognition as a poet after the publishing of his Red Skeletons collection said to be heavily indebted to Charles Baudelaire and Edgar Allan Poe.

The Black Sun Press produced finely crafted books in small editions, including works by, among others, D. H. Lawrence, Archibald MacLeish, James Joyce, Kay Boyle, and Hart Crane. It also issued two more volumes of Crosby's poetry, Chariot of the Sun and Transit of Venus. In 1929, Crosby published Mad Queen, collection of verse influenced by Surrealism. Torchbearer, a collection of his poetry with an afterward by Ezra Pound, and Aphrodite in Flight, a meditation on love and the principles of aeronautics, were both published posthumously. A boxed set containing Chariot of the Sun with D. H. Lawrence's intro, Transit of Venus with T. S. Eliot's intro, Mad Queen with Stuart Gilbert's intro and Torchbearer was brought out in 1932.

On December 10, 1929, Crosby and Josephine Bigelow, née Rotch, a newly married woman with whom Crosby had been carrying on an affair, committed dual suicide. Crosby's death scandalised Boston's Back Bay society.

Following her husband's death, Caresse Crosby edited his papers and continued the work of the Black Sun Press. She published and translated some of the works of Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker and others, as well as volumes of poetry (Crosses of Gold (Léon Pichon, 1935), Painted Shores (Black Sun Press, 1927), Poems for Harry Crosby (Black Sun Press, 1931)). Alvin Redman published her autobiography, Passionate Years, in 1955.

Back to Main Page


HAYWARD Mary (I2628) [Female] d. 1842 Newchurch, IOW, ENG

Source
Title: UK Census 1851

Source
Author: IOW Family History Society
Title: Isle of Wight FHS
Publication: Name: On line database;

Back to Main Page


JACOBS Harriet (I2629) [Female] b. 23 AUG 1807 Binstead, IOW, ENG - d. 1899 Isle of Wight, England

Source
Author: Stephen Randall (stephen.randall@village.uunet.be)
Title: Randall Transcription of Church Records
Publication: Name: Births, Deaths and marriages from 1550 to 1900 on the IOW;

Occupation: 1851

Source
Title: UK Census 1851

Source
Title: Free BMD (on line)
Publication: Name: Transcription of British BDM's from 1837 onwards;

Unmarried at 1861 census

Back to Main Page

JACOBS James (I2630) [Male] b. 15 JUL 1810 Arreton, Hampshire, England

Source
Author: Stephen Randall (stephen.randall@village.uunet.be)
Title: Randall Transcription of Church Records
Publication: Name: Births, Deaths and marriages from 1550 to 1900 on the IOW;

FILE - INDICTMENTS - ref. NBC/31/84 - date: 1830 Easter Sessions
|_ [from Scope and Content] NAME: James Jacob late of Newport, labourer
---------------------------------------------------------------
FILE - INDICTMENTS - ref. NBC/31/65 - date: 1825 Midsummer Sessions
|_ [from Scope and Content] OFFENCE: unlawfully entering a victualling house belonging to James Jacob; disturbing the peace; assaulting James Jacob
|_ [from Scope and Content] PERSONS BOUND BY RECOGNIZANCE: Robert Galley, Henry Stark, Robert Lock, James Richards, Charles Jacob, Edward Laney, Charles Laney, Thomas Snow, Edward White, Sarah Shaplin, John Dashwood, John Arquimbo, Thomas Hillier, Henry Grant, William Denton
-------------------------------------------------------
Reference: NBC/31/84
INDICTMENTS

Creation dates: 1830 Easter Sessions

Scope and Content
NAME: James Jacob late of Newport, labourer

OFFENCE: stealing 12 pounds of rope and 12 yards of rope belonging to William Mortimer

DATE: 31 Oct 1829

Back to Main Page



This HTML database was produced by a registered copy of GED4WEB icon (web page link)GED4WEB version 4.33

Back to Top Of Page

Back to Main Page

Copyright 2014 Michael Jacobs